Ancient and Modern - some Lichfield Buildings
 
Although often thought of as primarily a Georgian City, in reality buildings from the late medieval to the 20th century can still be found in Lichfield. The Lichfield City Conservation Area, which was designated in 1970, contains over 200 listed buildings and many others of historic interest within its boundary. The buildings we have featured here are just a small selection of what can be seen today.
 
Cruck House

The medieval Cruck House on Stowe Street, originally 2 cottages dating from the late 15th or early 16th century, was restored in 1971 as part of a larger Lichfield City Council regeneration scheme. This Grade II* listed building has since served as a local community centre.

Photo - Frank Horsfall, 2005
Cruck House
 
Stowe House
This large 18th century Grade II* listed house, standing prominently on a hill at the east end of Stowe Pool, was built around 1750 for Elizabeth Aston. A century later, in 1850, it was the home of the Lichfield banker and South Staffordshire Railway director Richard Greene. After wartime service as a school, then postwar use as a nurse's home and a brief period as a conference centre, the house was sold in 1968 to become a Management Training Centre. In December 2019 it was converted into four self-contained office suites.

Photo - Lesley Bushell, 2020
 
St John without the Barrs

The Hospital of St John without the Barrs on St John Street was located just outside the City's Culstrubbe gate. This Grade I listed property is said to be one of the finest 15th century brick buildings in the country and is still in use today.

Photo - Lesley Bushell, 2019
St John without the Barrs
 
Erasmus Darwin's House
Erasmus Darwin's House

Darwin House on Beacon Street, the former home of Erasmus Darwin, was built about 1758 on the site of the Common Hall of the medieval Vicars choral. Following restoration in 1999 this Grade I listed mid-georgian building has served as a museum, holding a number of objects which were the property of Erasmus Darwin and his family.

Photo - Frank Horsfall, 2005
 
Sandford Street

This mid to late 16th century timber framed house in Sandford Street was a butchers shop for over 50 years. The Grade II listed building was renovated in 2019 with modern office space on the ground floor. It is pictured here shortly after restoration.

Photo - Lesley Bushell, 2020
Sandford Street
 
Quarry Lodge
Quarry Lodge

Quarry Lodge on Tamworth Road was built in 1825 by Thomas Rowley, a physician and notable Lichfield benefactor. After being used as offices by the County Planning Department in the 1970s, this picturesque Gothic style house with twin octagonal turrets was restored in 1983 and is now listed, Grade II.

Photo - Lesley Bushell, 2019
 
Quonians Lane

There are several buildings of interest in Quonians Lane on the east side of Dam Street. No. 1, which is illustrated here, is a late 16th or early 17th century timber-framed cottage with an interesting canopy over the entrance. This Grade II listed building is now used as an antique shop.
Photo - Lesley Bushell, 2019
Quonians Lane
 
St Michaels Hospital
St Michael's Hospital

St Michael's Hospital on Trent Valley Road was originally built as the Lichfield Union Workhouse so is an important part of the City's history. This Grade II listed Tudor Gothic gatehouse building was designed by W.B. Moffat & G.G. Scott and opened in 1841. An unusual feature is the Georgian cupola above the main building.

Photo - Lesley Bushell, 2018
 
The Bishop's Palace

The Bishop's Palace was built in 1687 by Edward Pierce, replacing the previous timber framed building that was damaged in the Civil War. The Grade I listed building is also notable as the residence of Anna Seward (from 1754 to 1809) and of Gilbert Walmisley. Since 1954 the palace has been occupied by Lichfield Cathedral School.

Photo - Lesley Bushell, 2019
The Bishop's Palace
 
The Free Library
The Free Library

The former Public Library on Beacon Street was built in 1859 by Birdlake & Lovatt, becoming only the second Free Library in the country. The building is listed Grade II and, following the re-location of the library and Lichfield Joint Record Office, has been used since 1998 as a Registry Office.

Photo - Lesley Bushell, 2019
 
Samuel Johnson's Birthplace

Dr Johnson's house on Breadmarket Street is a three storey Queen Anne town house built in a transitional style merging timber framing and brick. This Grade I listed building was built around 1707 as the home and bookshop of Michael Johnson, the father of Samuel Johnson.

Photo - Frank Horsfall, 2005
Dr Johnson's House